The misery continues for Coventry

This week marked the latest low point in the sorry recent history of Coventry City as the club entered administration.

Coventry were relegated from the Premier League in 2001 and it would be fair to say no club in the Football League has had a more miserable 12 years than Coventry. Administration is a huge blow for their fans just when they were hoping to stabilize in League 1, but by now Cov fans are used to bitter disappointment.

The Ricoh Arena is at the centre of Coventry's latest problems

The Ricoh Arena is at the centre of Coventry’s latest problems

In 2001 the Sky Blues were relegated from the Premier League after 34 unbroken years in the top division. This was despite the best efforts of manager Gordon Strachan and despite having a squad which included John Hartson, Mustapha Hadji, Craig Bellamy, Lee Carsley, Gary Breen and Gary McSheffrey.

Despite losing some of their best players Coventry expected to be challenging for a quick return to the Premier League, but they found it tough to adapt to life in the second tier.

They quickly went from big-guns to mid-table mainstays and struggled to build any kind of momentum in the Championship. In their 11 years in the second tier they only finished in the top half three times and never looked capable of challenging for promotion. Their highest finish came in 2006 when they ended the season eighth in the Championship but even then they were 12 points outside the play-off spots.

There were big expectations for managers such as Gary McAllister, Micky Adams, Iain Dowie, Chris Coleman and Aidy Boothroyd to turn the club’s fortunes around but all of them struggled as the club further stagnated.

Many clubs find moving to a new stadium can give them impetus, but the opening of the 32,609-seat Ricoh Arena in 2005 had no such effect on Coventry, who remained in entrenched in the lower end of the Championship.

The stadium became a costly albatross around the club’s neck. Coventry narrowly avoided administration in 2007, but the cost of renting the state of the art stadium continued to hamper the club.

Coventry’s inability to sell out the massive ground caused different problems. It provoked ridicule from fans of other clubs who went to great lengths every time they visited the Ricoh to point out the vast expanses of empty seats. It also had an expectedly detrimental effect on the players. Once the initial excitement of new facilities wore off, they were left with an empty bowl and very little atmosphere to inspire them.

Coventry’s dismal time in the Championship came to an end last year when they were finally put out of their misery and relegated to League 1. At first glance it looked like a damaging blow for the club but fans and pundits put a positive spin on the situation, pointing to big clubs like Norwich, Leicester and Southampton who had been relegated to League 1 and quickly returned in a far stronger position (on and off the field) than when they were relegated.

Unfortunately, this season has been yet another mediocre and ultimately disappointing season of false-dawns and let-downs.

Andy Thorn was let go just 3 games into the season and it took the Sky Blues nine games to register their first league win, against Oldham at the end of September. Things looked set to improve as Mark Robins transformed the team and got them playing vibrant attacking football.

Unfortunately after dragging the club to the edge of the play-off spots Robins left to take over at Huddersfield Town. Results since his departure have been far from catastrophic and much to the amazement of onlookers the East Midlands club has sustained its play-off push.

This was of course until this week’s announcement that the club would be entering administration, meaning it would suffer a 10 point deduction, all but ending their hopes of going up via the play-offs.

The news was unsurprising. A few days prior to the announcement, the club had moved many of its operations out of the stadium.

The club is estimated to be combatting debts of around £60m, and the biggest problem is the ludicrously high rent the club currently pays on the stadium, which is run by ACL. The Coventry owners Sisu have been lambasted for agreeing to ACL’s high demands in the first place, but have found it difficult to negotiate a solution to the rent bill of £1.3m.

The club is in a desperate mess, and fans are unsurprisingly furious with the club’s owners.

Coventry never recovered from their shock relegation from the Premier League in 2001, and since then has failed to generate any momentum. The 12 years which followed relegation have been miserable and uninspiring, and new boss Steven Pressley has a delicate juggling act to perform if he is to reverse the club’s decline.

The former Celtic and Falkirk defender takes over a club with bags of potential but a heap of problems off the pitch.

After 12 years Coventry supporters just want something to cheer. The club recently disappointed its fans once again by losing 3-2 on aggregate to Crewe in the JPT semi-final, meaning they were denied their first Wembley final since their famous FA Cup triumph in 1987.

Supporters are just asking, when are they going to be allowed to be positive again?

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